Saturday, November 10, 2007

Kalua Pig

Moist. Delicious. Smoky.

Traditional roast pig is a luau dish. The pig is wrapped in lualua (taro) leaves, lowered into a pit and slow barbecued for hours. Nowadays the pig is more often roasted in a crock pot for 6-8 hours, even so, it remains an island delight. It is traditionally served with long rice, poi, and/or sweet potatoes. Hawaiians don't believe in eating until they're full, they believe in eating until they are tired!


Hawaiian Roast Pig


5 pound pork butt roast
2 tablespoons Hawaiian rock salt
3 teaspoons liquid smoke

Rub pork roast with 1 1/2 tbs of rock salt and 1 tsp. liquid smoke*. Place fat side up in crock pot. Add 1/2 cup water** and 1 tsp. liquid smoke. Replace lid and cook on high for 5 or 6 hours. Remove roast from crock pot and shred^. Add to the juice in the crock pot 1/2 tbs. rock salt^^ and 1 tsp. liquid smoke. Stir. Return shredded pork to brine and soak on low for 1/2 hour, or however long it takes to prepare your chosen side dishes.

*I put the teaspoonful of liquid smoke on my hands and rub the roast down.

**Some recipes call for apple cider. I use water.

^Use two forks to pull the meat apart. It will shred easily.

^^This is a very salty dish. I eliminate this last half tablespoon of salt.

6 Comments:

LZ Blogger said...

Man this looks good. It must be close to dinner time. ~ jb///

quilly said...

Trust me LZ, it is good. We just had the leftovers as hot sandwiches or lunch ... yum!

Brooke said...

This is exactly the recipe I was telling you about that I was going to send to you and never did... Yummy, isn't it? I love it!

I Dive At Night said...

No Turkey post? Oh wait, it's just the start of the day for you. Hmmm, the sun is setting here. Time to run off to my Thanksgiving pot luck dinner.

capps505 said...

where do you buy rock salt

Pacific Quilly said...

Brooke -- they served this in the school cafeteria shortly after we chatted and I had to have the recipe!

Morgan -- no turkey!

Capps -- any supermarket should carry rock salt in their spice isle. Hawaiian rock salt, however may be harder to come by off island I seriously doubt it has to be Hawaiian rock salt, despite what the locals say -- though it should be sea salt.

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